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Thread: Files that cannot be moved in Disk Defrag

  1. #1
    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    Files that cannot be moved in Disk Defrag

    What are these files and why must they always remain apart from contiguous files on the hard drive?

  2. #2
    Techzonez Governor Super Moderator Conan's Avatar
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    What are you using to defrag, the buit-in Windows defragmenter?

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    Friendly Neighborhood Super Moderator phishhead's Avatar
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    some are your fat tables and system files.



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    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    Conan...yes, I used the built-in Windows defragmenter.

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    Techzonez Governor Super Moderator Conan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wumply
    Conan...yes, I used the built-in Windows defragmenter.
    I've been using Perfectdisk and I think it's much better than the built-in defragmenter as it hardly ever will run into files that cannot be defragmented.

  6. #6
    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    Conan...but those files that "cannot be moved"...you don't think for some reason those were simply not intended to be moved? I'd always just assumed this. I'll take a looksee at PerfectDisk.

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    Techzonez Governor Super Moderator Conan's Avatar
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    Sometimes it's also dependent on your hard drive size. I used to have this 20 gig drive that would always have files that could not be defragmented. When I shifted to 160 and 120 gig drives I haven't run into that situation yet.

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    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    "Weird"'," I thought when I read your lastl post. And got so curious that I looked for further information in Google where I found the following interesting paragraphs. Fascinating all this going on behind the scenes.

    When Windows 2000 starts up, disk space is allocated to the MFT and the Paging File for their exclusive use. Itís important to know that the APIs that enable safe defragmentation do not support the movement of these files; as a result, they cannot be moved safely. Therefore, itís recommended that the MFT and the Paging File be defragmented when Windows 2000 is not running. But, because this places them beyond the range of routine defragmentation methods, the standard solution is to defragment the MFT and the Paging File during boot time, using a third-party, enterprise-level defragmenter.

    Hibernate File
    The Hibernate File is the disk space where memory data is stored when the computer is turned off. Because the location of the Hibernate File is determined very early in the boot process, it cannot be moved. It can, however, be defragmented safely at boot time using a third-party, enterprise-level defragmenter.

    Directories
    Directories can also become fragmented; adding to the time it takes to access files. Windows 2000 directories, on an NTFS disk, can be defragmented while the operating system is running. However, FAT directories can only be defragmented at boot time.

    Here's the source: http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000...int/defrag.asp

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    Friendly Neighborhood Super Moderator phishhead's Avatar
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    so wumply are you saying you can't move fat tables and system files.



  10. #10
    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    I don't feel I know enough to say that FAT system Files and tables can't be moved. And the article I found weas talking only, I believe, about the NTF file system. The NTFS's Master File Table would be, I'd guess, analogous to FAT's, but do the same rules apply? I don't know.

    From the following bit of the article, it would appear the files referred to can't be moved.

    "When Windows 2000 starts up, disk space is allocated to the MFT and the Paging File for their exclusive use. Itís important to know that the APIs that enable safe defragmentation do not support the movement of these files; as a result, they cannot be moved safely." I wonder if the key word is "safely?"

    Conan, harking back to your 4040th post (this thread), did you mean "files that could not be defragmented" or "files that could not be moved?"

  11. #11
    Friendly Neighborhood Super Moderator phishhead's Avatar
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    wumply I dont think its anything to lose sleep on but what I do when I defrag is I have a prog called windows washer. It deletes temp files, recycle bin, page files, and so on. then I turn off any apps that are running in the taskbar (especially the anitvirus) then I run it. but if you are running NTFS to be completely honest it handles file allocation alot better than FAT and with a fresh defrag I can't tell the difference in NTFS performance.



  12. #12
    Silver Member joshsiao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phishhead
    wumply I dont think its anything to lose sleep on but what I do when I defrag is I have a prog called windows washer. It deletes temp files, recycle bin, page files, and so on. then I turn off any apps that are running in the taskbar (especially the anitvirus) then I run it. but if you are running NTFS to be completely honest it handles file allocation alot better than FAT and with a fresh defrag I can't tell the difference in NTFS performance.
    I can tell some difference. But the case is that NTFS is less likely to get fragmented then FAT 32. FAT systems will have the disadvantage of higher probability of being fragemented so you'll have to defrag constantly to keep the same performance.
    "Never seem more learnt then the people you are with. Wear your learning like a watch and keep it hidden. Do not pull it out to count the hours, but give the time when you are asked."
    ~Chesterfield

  13. #13
    Techzonez Governor Super Moderator Conan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wumply

    Conan, harking back to your 4040th post (this thread), did you mean "files that could not be defragmented" or "files that could not be moved?"
    Oops, sorry, I was referring to "files that could not be defragmented".

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