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Thread: Amd 64

  1. #1
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    Amd 64

    okay i see a lot of people getting it or already owning it.
    is it really necessary right now? i walked into a store today and was so tempted to grab it, but thought, ill wait till christmas and the computer shows and the prices (will drop a lot by then, since it's still relatively new to the market).
    i mean, how many programs and games right now require it?
    just wondering, dont get me wrong, not bashing it at all...just really curious why everyone wants the hottest thing now, when from what I understand, isn't really needed...yet.
    btw, i love my AMD.

  2. #2
    Platinum+ Member bhxtyrant's Avatar
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    I ask myself these same questions evey day lol.I also want to get one but dont really know why i want one other then saving the trouble of having to upgrade later even though prices will drop in time.

  3. #3
    The Beast Master TZ Veteran PIPER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jak3y
    okay i see a lot of people getting it or already owning it.
    is it really necessary right now? i walked into a store today and was so tempted to grab it, but thought, ill wait till christmas and the computer shows and the prices (will drop a lot by then, since it's still relatively new to the market).
    i mean, how many programs and games right now require it?
    just wondering, dont get me wrong, not bashing it at all...just really curious why everyone wants the hottest thing now, when from what I understand, isn't really needed...yet.
    btw, i love my AMD.
    Is it necessary?.....no
    Is there any software that requires it....no
    Are there any games that require it....not to my knowledge

    It all boils down to, "The one who dies with the most toys wins!!"

    lol

  4. #4
    Near Life Experienced TZ Veteran zipp51's Avatar
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    One game that I know of is 64 bit ready and that is Far Cry.When I build my A64 I can test it against my old Nforce board.
    The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

  5. #5
    Junior Member peng's Avatar
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    The game may be ready but the OS is not. Even on OS's such as linux that are 64bit there are issues with third party apps and plugins not being 64bit. I was running 64bit Ubuntu but switched back to the 32 bit so I could run the flash plugin with firefox.

  6. #6
    The Beast Master TZ Veteran PIPER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zipp51
    One game that I know of is 64 bit ready and that is Far Cry.When I build my A64 I can test it against my old Nforce board.
    Close but not quite my friend....here is some info from PC World about the upcoming 64 bit era:

    Games, Video First for Boost

    Game makers--traditionally among the first to make use of new technology--see clear advantages to 64-bit computing.

    That extra speed will let programmers add remarkable detail to their software, says Tim Sweeney, founder and lead programmer at Epic Games, maker of the popular Unreal game franchise.

    "You'll see better textures, more realistic sounds, and larger and more realistic environments," Sweeney adds.

    Plus, the characters themselves will be rendered with dramatically more detail. You'll see more realistic representation of features such as hair, skin, and eyes. And the computer-run characters will have more realistic artificial intelligence, he says.

    Epic has already updated Unreal 2003 for use on a 64-bit system, Sweeney says. The program will be ready to go as soon as a compatible 64-bit OS arrives. The company, which typically spends about two years creating each of its new games, is already working on its first fully 64-bit game, which is scheduled to hit store shelves in 2005.

    Video encoding will also improve in a 64-bit world, says Tom Huntington, corporate communications manager at DivX. The company's DivX codec compresses DVD-quality video up to ten times more than the MPEG2 standard, making it easier to transmit over the Internet.

    A 64-bit processor will improve both the encoding and decoding of video, he says. Better still, when you view a video file on a 64-bit desktop, you'll see "a noticeable difference in speed," he says, resulting in more frames per second and a more film-like playback.

    Eventually the benefit will go far beyond speed, says Rich Heye, vice president of AMD's microprocessor business unit. The key to 64-bit computing is that it will open up possibilities for creative programmers in ways never before seen.
    When Do We Start?

    Apple and AMD executives envision 64-bit desktop computers on the scene pretty much now. Apple's next-generation of hardware, based on the 64-bit-capable G5 processor, begins shipping in August. AMD expects to ship its first Athlon 64 desktop and notebook processors as early as September (it's already shipping a server version of the chip called Opteron).

    But to take advantage of those 64-bit systems, you'll need a 64-bit-capable desktop operating system. That's where things get more complicated, and the Apple and AMD/Microsoft camps part ways.

    When Apple rolls out its new G5 products in August, it will include an updated version of the current 32-bit OS X operating system code-named Jaguar, Apple's Joswiak says. The updated OS will support 32-bit applications with the ability to make 64-bit requests from the processor.

    "The important thing for us [is] we didn't want to create a separate OS that is 64 bits," Joswiak says. "What is essential is that this OS and this hardware will run 32-bit applications with no recompiling--it will just run them." Apple hasn't announced plans for a pure 64-bit operating system; Panther, an updated 32-bit OS due out the end of this year, will have Jaguar-like 64-bit support.

    AMD's Athlon 64 processor will work like previous Athlon chips under the current 32-bit Windows XP, but the OS does not support the chip's 64-bit capabilities. That waits until Microsoft ships its as-yet-unnamed 64-bit version of Windows XP for the Athlon 64, which is about to begin beta testing. That OS will support both 32-bit and 64-bit applications; Microsoft has not said when it will ship the OS, however.

    Once Windows catches up, there's still the issue of making today's PC hardware 64-bit ready. "The biggest challenge is going to be the device drivers in 64-bit mode," says Microprocessor Report's Krewell. "You need all new drivers for all of your key components [graphics cards, hard drives, and the like]--all the stuff that the operating system needs to work well," he says. "If you want 64 bits because you want performance, you can't have a bunch of 32-bit drivers mucking things up."

    And then, finally, come the 64-bit-ready applications. AMD's Heye admits the transition from 32 to 64 bits in everyday desktop applications won't happen overnight. But he says by putting 64 bits into its upcoming processors, AMD is preparing for the future.

    "Will it happen in 2004, or maybe 2005? It's hard to say. It will migrate over time, and when it does happen we'll be everywhere--in the backroom, on the desktop, in the notebook--the works."
    Whither Intel?

    Notably absent from all of this 64-bit desktop discussion is Intel, the world's biggest processor vendor.

    While the company has devoted considerable time and resources to developing its 64-bit Itanium processor, now in its second generation, that high-end product is geared largely toward servers. In fact, Intel has not disclosed any plans for a 64-bit desktop processor.

    "Sixty-four bits is of great use in the back office, for servers and databases," says Intel spokesperson George Alfs. "The big iron has good use for 64-bits," he adds, but says the company isn't convinced the technology yet has a place on the desktop.

    "It's hard to peg an exact time for this transition," Alfs adds. "The infrastructure isn't here today," but, he notes, "we're keeping our options open."

    Intel wants to keep 64-bit computing as a server technology for the time being, so it can sell more Itanium processors, Krewell says. It doesn't want to sell the Itanium as a desktop processor. Plus, there is a key difference between the Itanium and the Apple and AMD chips. While the G5 and Athlon 64 can run 32-bit applications natively, the Itanium is a pure 64-bit chip that requires slower software emulation to run 32-bit apps.

    Rumors persist, however, that Intel has created a 32- and 64-bit capable processor code-named Yamhill that could ship should the 64-bit desktop market heat up, Krewell says. If such a technology exists, it could even be seeded into Intel's next-generation desktop processor, code-named Prescott, which is due this year. Intel's Alfs declines to comment on the Yamhill rumors.

    Epic's Sweeney agrees that Intel seems reluctant to move to 64 bits on the desktop, but he says the company is too savvy to let others get ahead on this important technology.

    "In the next two years, either Intel will ship a 64-bit desktop chip or it will lose the majority of its consumer and business market," Sweeney says. "If I was in Intel's position, I would be working...to get a 64-bit chip ready, but in the meantime, I would be downplaying the importance of 64 bits."

    AMD has also announced in the last year that the several other games would be released to the marketplace optimised for the x86-64 platform. The company's Web site boasts that THQ and GSC Gameworld will be releasing S.T.A.L.K.E.R: Shadows of Chernobyl optimised for AMD64 in the first quarter of 2005, and back in January 2004 AMD director of marketing John Morris said that games companies Ubisoft and Epic Games would be releasing 64-bit versions of their respective games Far Cry and Unreal Tournament in the first quarter of that year. Neither game so far has made it to the marketplace.

    Local AMD spokesperson Caroline Francis told CNET.com.au that "about 50 percent" of the company's local sales at the moment are shipments of Athlon 64 CPUs. AMD's 64-bit CPUs have been available in the desktop segment of the market for around 18 months.




    And AMD's Linda Kohout confirmed to CNET.com.au this morning that Vivendi Universal's Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay was also shipping optimised for the x86-64. Sources verified that the Riddick game CD contained optimised binaries for the platform.


    A screengrab from Chronicles of Riddick: Escape from Butcher Bay

    While the developments are encouraging for those looking forward to the performance enhancements that 64-bit computing may bring to games, at this time 64-bit games are thin on the ground, with only a half-dozen known to be in development. The first 64-bit game to be released was Shadow Ops: Red Mercury, which was released by Atari back in September of last year.

    Part of the problem may be that Microsoft has not yet released the final 64-bit version of Windows XP, which it has been developing for several years. The software giant said several weeks ago that it would be releasing the final desktop version at the beginning of next month. A second release candidate version of the software was released to developers on the Microsoft Developers Network in February.

    But Kohout, who spends her days as an AMD marketing manager focusing on gaming, said: "I think that it will take a more mainstream version of the operating system before the bulk of games start coming out in 64-bit. I think there are a lot of developers who've already started to look forward to the release of the Longhorn operating system."


    Shadow Ops: Red Mercury, the first 64-bit game

    It was probably only the more technology-savvy gamers who would initially migrate to the 64-bit version of Windows, she said, although consumers could see large parts of the game development industry releasing 64-bit optimised games "before the end of 2005". Kohout said AMD has spoken about the issue to "most of the major developers around the world, especially the ones that are interested in being on the leading edge of technology".
    Last edited by PIPER; April 1st, 2005 at 09:40 AM.

  7. #7
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    ill just wait and save my money for the next 2years then build a big a$$ comp thatll kill all of yours and i STILL won't know how to over-clock it and adjust BIOS settings

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