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Thread: What exactly is "Load"

  1. #1
    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    What exactly is "Load"

    To expand the subject...I just installed this cute, little freeware program: FreeRAM XP Pro 1.40. It shows me at any moment.

    the amount of my unused RAM.
    the amount of free virtual memory
    The LOAD.
    the CPU usage
    The total uptime from boot.

    Can someone clue me in detail what LOAD is. (it's been running at 40-43% since installation of the program.)
    I've created my own website...a collection of moving, sad and happy and humorous poems which I would like to share with others. They come from stories my dad used to tell me when I was a kid. If you could glance at my site and if you know of others who might enjoy it and perhaps tell them of it, I would be most appreciative. Thank you. The address is www.metrocast.net/~wumply/exper-1.html

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    not to answer you question but is this one of those ram optimizers? If so, I hear they don't work at all - they never have for me either.

  3. #3
    Old and Cranky Super Moderator rik's Avatar
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    @LK, Yes it is. I run it and it seems to work pretty well.

    @Wumply, the "Load" is basically how much of your RAM is being used by running applications and the OS.

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    Triple Platinum Member hotmale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wumply
    To expand the subject...I just installed this cute, little freeware program: FreeRAM XP Pro 1.40. It shows me at any moment.

    Can someone clue me in detail what LOAD is. (it's been running at 40-43% since installation of the program.)
    FreeRAM XP Pro is one of my all-time favourites. To see what "Load" means, just hold your mouse pointer over the bar that displays it - it shows the explanation as a tooltip.

    Quote Originally Posted by lynchknot
    not to answer you question but is this one of those ram optimizers? If so, I hear they don't work at all - they never have for me either.
    I don't know what you tried but I assure you this one works. I checked using EAsy Info (an application provided with EA games). This app can display the amount of free RAM. I checked before and after using FreeRAM XP Pro and the difference was remarkable (BTW, FreeRAM itself displays the amount of free RAM available but I used EAsy Info to check it wasn't lying).

    Edit: Seems I need typing lessons, rik!
    Last edited by hotmale; July 4th, 2005 at 21:01 PM.

  5. #5
    Triple Platinum Member Curio's Avatar
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    The whole point of RAM is that the processor works on stuff thats in it, so if you take stuff out of it you then have to load it back into RAM to work with it. RAM optimisers usually take stuff out of RAM (who knows why?) and present the user with an amount of 'free' RAM which the user then thinks is great. Usually these programs will decrease performance in the same way as not having enough ram does because they are usually set to automatically free up a certain amount of ram by paging it back to the hard disk so you have empty RAM which is supposed to be of benefit to something.

    The same effect can be achieved by taking out a stick of memory.
    I'm using Windows 7 - you got a problem with that?

  6. #6
    Triple Platinum Member hotmale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curio
    The whole point of RAM is that the processor works on stuff thats in it, so if you take stuff out of it you then have to load it back into RAM to work with it. RAM optimisers usually take stuff out of RAM (who knows why?) and present the user with an amount of 'free' RAM which the user then thinks is great. Usually these programs will decrease performance in the same way as not having enough ram does because they are usually set to automatically free up a certain amount of ram by paging it back to the hard disk so you have empty RAM which is supposed to be of benefit to something.

    The same effect can be achieved by taking out a stick of memory.
    I guess you misunderstood how the program functions. I once wrote a short review of FreeRAM in which I mentioned:
    ...When you close a certain application, it should but does not always correctly release the RAM it was consuming...
    This obsolete memory is what's freed up by FreeRAM, not the memory being used by the processor.

  7. #7
    Triple Platinum Member Curio's Avatar
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    I was talking about so-called RAM optimisers in general not your specific application but even so I would like to see some data to support your theory. It's another one of those little theories that sound great but wheres the specifics? I understand perfectly what they say including the automatic freeing up of a certain amount of RAM - which is exactly what I was talking about, empty RAM, .....please. It's funny that with the amount of money, time and effort that MS could put into optimising the RAM in the OS they wrote that many little firms with no source code can do it better.

    I say Snake Oil but some people like Snake Oil - to each their own. I once went to a PC which was running like a dog and turned off the memory optimiser upon which it began working perfectly well, the customer had bought so deeply into the 'free RAM' theory they wouldn't have it that it was the problem so turned it back on - even though the PC once again slowed to a crawl. I still got paid, so go for it.
    I'm using Windows 7 - you got a problem with that?

  8. #8
    Hardware guy Super Moderator FastGame's Avatar
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    I agree with Curio and lynchknot. If your software fails to release mem or has a mem leak its time for a replacement of the software

  9. #9
    Triple Platinum Member hotmale's Avatar
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    @Curio, as I've already said, I don't know which program you're talking about; you're just referring to them as "so-called RAM optimisers". May be you tried one that didn't work and now you have a bad idea about all of them.

    I said I like this program, rik said it works well for him, it also got a 5-star rating from CNET Downlaod.com's editor and MajorGeeks' users.

    Also I didn't come up with the theory that it frees up obsolete memory, here's an excerpt PCWorld's review:
    When ill-mannered programs don't release your computer's RAM after you run them, FreeRAM can do the job. FreeRAM XP Pro is a freeware application that frees and defragments your computer's random access memory. As you use your computer, open applications, surf the Internet, and navigate Windows, your system's memory usually decreases. FreeRAM XP Pro frees up this memory, thereby increasing system response time, stability, speed, and efficiency.
    Quote Originally Posted by Curio
    It's funny that with the amount of money, time and effort that MS could put into optimising the RAM in the OS they wrote that many little firms with no source code can do it better.
    I don't see why that's funny. Why not? Some of the greatest programs I've ever tried are little open source projects with no funding.

  10. #10
    Triple Platinum Member Curio's Avatar
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    No worries we can agree to disagree, if you would like to further research the subject there is an article done by Mark Russinovich of Sysinternals fame that you may like to take a look at. As he is way cleverer than I will ever be so I like to agree with him where possible. I love some of those little programs too like PSPAD the freeware code editor but it's not the same thing as something which is an OS task - like memory management is. Hey I have been wrong before and I am in no doubt that I will be wrong again.
    I'm using Windows 7 - you got a problem with that?

  11. #11
    Triple Platinum Member hotmale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curio
    No worries we can agree to disagree, if you would like to further research the subject there is an article done by Mark Russinovich of Sysinternals fame that you may like to take a look at. As he is way cleverer than I will ever be so I like to agree with him where possible.
    I'm not trying to sound like a "know-it-all" But I know and totally understand what you're talking about. Forcing programs to give up the memory they're using will degrade their performance. And FreeRAM can do that...

    FreeRAM has the automatic free up mode (which I believe to be the benefic one). But you can also choose the amount of RAM you want to free. I went ahead and told it to free 256 megs. As you'd expect, the whole system's response became slow. This is the difference: when I told it to free 256MB, it forced running processes to release memory that's being used which explains the slowdown.

    I didn't write FreeRAM XP Pro, so I don't know what it really does. But the author claims it frees up memory that's not being used. It makes perfect sense; this memory can be freed up so other programs running can make good use of it.

    Example: When you first boot the PC, the OS and running apps occupy a certain amount of memory. Of course you'll start to launch different programs and close them when you're done. Browse on your favourite browser while listening to music, open you favourite e-mail client to check for mail, start MS Word and type in whatever... Now after you close everything the amount of occupied memory will certainly be more than when you had just started Windows. Let's say now you want to play some demanding game, you could definitely put that idle (yet occupied) memory into good use for the game to run more smoothly Hope I made myself clear. I'm not trying to prove you're wrong or that I'm right.

  12. #12
    Old and Cranky Super Moderator rik's Avatar
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    Memory leaks are a fact of life. This app does seem to help in my situation with this issue.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rik
    @LK, Yes it is. I run it and it seems to work pretty well.
    Rik, I've read somewhere like langalisp that they are BS.

    BTW, "load" for Rik means he needs to be changed

    *edit:

    That's worth repeating, because it's the central point: Unused RAM is wasted RAM.

    Thus, any tool that "frees up" RAM or "creates holes in RAM" or any similar thing is really creating a pool of unused--- wasted!--- RAM.

    Memory Optimizers

    I’ve long railed against these things. The only thing that these programs can do is harm real system performance. My advice, stay away from any “memory optimizer” programs. Don’t believe me? How about taking renowned Windows guru Mark Russinovich’s word for it? In his article entitled “The Memory-Optimization Hoax, RAM optimizers make false promises” he lays out the argument better than I ever could. (I can’t reprint the article because of copyright.) His conclusion is that these programs are “fraudware” and he has “yet to see a RAM optimizer that lives up to any of its claims.”…’Nuff said!
    - more: http://www.tweakhound.com/xp/xptweaks/supertweaks11.htm

    Lankalisp: http://www.langa.com/newsletters/2004/2004-12-16.htm#2

    Dear Fred From a very grateful subscriber to your Plus edition...

    I refer to your http://langa.com/newsletters/2004/2004-11-29.htm#9 edition and the subject of Memory Optimizers, which you suggest are scams etc. I use FreeRam XP Pro - which is a totally free utility
    One Use That May Make Sense
    I can think of no good reason to keep any of these apps running on your system all the time. In all my tests, at best they took more than they gave; at worse they made my systems slower and less stable.

    But I can think of one instance where it might be useful to have a memory optimizer on hand for occasional manual use: It's benefit #1 mentioned above -- the ability to recover memory orphaned after an applications crash.

    The freeware RAMpage memory optimizer, RAMpage, for example, has a command-line-driven "run once then exit" mode. I've coded the command-line parameters into a batch file, and I now run RAMpage after some other application crashes: RAMpage loads, opens up a hole in RAM, tries to recover "orphaned" memory left by the crashed app, defrags what's left, and then exits. I'd never leave RAMpage (or any memory optimizer) running all the time due to the problems listed above, and because of the relative rarity of applications crashes. But as a simple, free way to try to clean up after an app does crash (and thus possibly avoiding the need to reboot) it seems to work pretty well.

    In fact, after some tinkering, I've developed a four-part strategy that gives me great results: I'm able to prevent most memory- and resource-related crashes in the first place, and can skate into the single digit range of User or GDI resources without any trouble at all. And when an app does die for some reason, I can now recover orphaned general memory without rebooting, using RAMpage. In my tests, I've gone day after day after day with my resources rock-steady and stable.

    The strategy involves several approaches, including optimizing all Windows memory areas -- the swapfile, Vcache, and so on. I'm putting the final touches on the four-part plan now, and will present it in detail in the next installment of this series. Stay tuned! - http://www.informationweek.com/story...7200583&pgno=5
    Last edited by lynchknot; July 6th, 2005 at 03:39 AM.

  14. #14
    Triple Platinum Member Curio's Avatar
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    Unused occupied memory is automatically swapped to the paging file on disk and doesn't effect performance. That article really is very good you know and there are 2 pages the second of which is probably the most interesting.

    If it works for you then go for it but I have yet to see a sensible argument for them or any data that supports their claims. Mark Russinovich is a geezer and if he says its rubbish and everything I have seen agrees with that then I won't argue. I'm told that Witnesses don't believe in Dinosaurs or that man has been to the moon. Because a lot of people agree on something doesn't make it true.

    Like I said we will agree to disagree.

    Let's forget about all that rubbish.
    Do you want to buy London Bridge - I will do you a good price?
    I'm using Windows 7 - you got a problem with that?

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    to whom are you speaking to? I'm not using one of the "optimizers" I'm just posting what I see. The last section of my post only states it may help but is marginal at best.

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