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Thread: Noise from power supply

  1. #1
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    Noise from power supply

    A few years ago when I bought my son a new computer, there was a high pitched whine coming from the power supply when the computer was turned off, but still plugged in. The company that sold us the computer said that is sometimes normal and there is nothing to be concerned about, but if I wanted them to replace the power supply, they would, and they did. Now, I am working on a friends older E-Machine computer and I notice the same high pitched whine from the power supply. Is the power supply starting to fail, or is it sometimes normal like that company told me. When I turn the computer on, I can't really hear the whine any more, but not sure. Many thanks in advance, Mike

  2. #2
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    While living in Germany, I was forced to utilize step-down transformers to convert the 240v native current to 115v current. This is a similar process to that accomplished by the computer PS. This was the only way that many U.S. manufactured devices could be used. These transformers were sold over and over again to newcomers. Some of them developed hums ranging from barely audible to loud. The question of safety and reliability was asked in the Stars and Stripes newspaper many times.

    The answer from the engineering community was that a hum was not necessarily a sign of trouble. They did indicate that you should monitor it closer.

    A power supply pumping higher voltage than required to the motherboard or a drive could fry very expensive electronic components. Power supplies are relativelly inexpensive. Some people spend a significant price for premium PS's. You should be able to find a medium priced PS for $40 to $50. Also remember that it is possible to correct a PS problem by purchasing a case that includes the PS. The "only the best will do crown" would not approve of most of these PS's, however I have never received a bad one when buying a case/PS combo. Don't know how much power you require, but this looks like it should do the job.

    I will also mention that a power supply testor is available for approximately $15. I have one. It hasn't been very useful. It will take a snapshot of the PS condition. It cannot be used to monitor voltages over a period of time. Therefore it cannot detect a problem that only happens when the power supply gets hot.
    Last edited by efc; May 20th, 2006 at 15:33 PM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks efc for the reply. I will make the suggestion to my buddy. Since the computer is about 6 years old, it is not worth much more than $50 so he may just deceide to keep his backups current, and hope for the best.

  4. #4
    Old and Cranky Super Moderator rik's Avatar
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    If it is that old it's probably a 250w PS. You can pick those up or even a tad larger for next to nothing. I'm getting ready to do that myself. Luckily I have enough scrap laying around that I can pull a comperable one out of an unused system.

  5. #5
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Here is a great solution.

    LINK

  6. #6
    Senior Member blackhat's Avatar
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    Geez EFC, I paid $10.00 for my last used PS! Nice find! DRB

    "Will Golf for Food"

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