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Thread: What is a Thorneycroft

  1. #1
    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    What is a Thorneycroft

    I suspectl it is a World War I and perhaps an English name or designation. I am reading a novel: [U]To Serve Them All My Engrland between World War I and World War II. And on p. 11 of the paperback, there's a reference to a boneshaker (I could look that up--a delapidated uncomfortable vehicle) and a bit further on, there is this: "I do hope they don't trust him with one of those heavy Thorneycrofts you chaps use." (The "you chaps" referring, I think, to the British soldiers who fought in World War.)

    Does some inhabitant of England (you Reverend?)--or anyone--who maybe even grew up there know what a Thorneycroft is? I had no success with Google.
    I've created my own website...a collection of moving, sad and happy and humorous poems which I would like to share with others. They come from stories my dad used to tell me when I was a kid. If you could glance at my site and if you know of others who might enjoy it and perhaps tell them of it, I would be most appreciative. Thank you. The address is www.metrocast.net/~wumply/exper-1.html

  2. #2
    Head Honcho Administrator Reverend's Avatar
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    Don't know if its the same one, but Thorneycrofts were shipbuilders.

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  3. #3
    Head Honcho Administrator Reverend's Avatar
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    Bit of investigating and i found this story from 1939:

    In December most of the vehicles, especially the coaches, were returned to a motor pool, in a much sorrier state than when we took them over. We travelled to Swindon and collected our proper Army vehicles, some three-ton open cab Thorneycrofts, with gearboxes equipped for cross-country work. I drove on one occasion and found the gearbox difficult, also being a wet day the rain drove in under the canvas hood. Other vehicles were one-ton or thirty-cwt. trucks and three-ton lorries. My vehicle was a one-ton Ford truck.
    Full article Here

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    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    Right on Reverend! I had asked this question also at wordorigins.com and someone replied with this link from wikipedia. I wonder if the guy just entered "Thorneycroft" in Wikipedia? Guess I'll have to train myself to think of Wikipedia as well as Google.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thornycroft

    Thanks.

  5. #5
    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    Hey...you got a new logo, Reverend. Tired of the old one?

  6. #6
    Head Honcho Administrator Reverend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wumply View Post
    Hey...you got a new logo, Reverend. Tired of the old one?
    Nope, just using this one during the World Cup.

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  7. #7
    Platinum+ Member z3n's Avatar
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    I found this.



    Thornycroft "Amazon" 6 x 6 trucks/half-tracks of the Argentine Army used as artillery prime movers. These are part of a batch of 12 units acquired in 1938 and converted into artillery tractors (note the armored hood over the engine) at the Esteban de Luca Arsenal. You'll note that by slipping a track, provided by the manufacturer, over the two rear axles these vehicles were easily converted into half-tracks (a feature common to Thornycroft and certain types of French trucks as far back as the early 1920s). The US version of this type of track was called the "Chase Track System". J. Walter Christie also experimented with a version of this track as well. I understand that the helmets were based on the Swiss design and are made of steel as can be seen the the left photo. More detailed information about this tank can be found in the book "Ancora dal Sudamerica"-by Dr. Georg von Rauch.

    Ref

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    Nobody knows I'm a dog. TZ Veteran petard's Avatar
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    Thorneycrofts .... are they anything like a Henweay?

    Many thanks to egghead for the cool .sig

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    Triple Platinum Member wumply's Avatar
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    Very cool, Z3N! Thanks. I also learned what a half-track was. Never had run into one and had never been curious enough to look it up.

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    Platinum+ Member z3n's Avatar
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    I like the mobile toilet equipment fastened to the rear panels.

    Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.~ Groucho

  11. #11
    Old and Cranky Super Moderator rik's Avatar
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    No takers eh petard?

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    The Beast Master TZ Veteran PIPER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rik View Post
    No takers eh petard?

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    Nobody knows I'm a dog. TZ Veteran petard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rik View Post
    No takers eh petard?

    Many thanks to egghead for the cool .sig

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