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Thread: How do I read RAM Sticks????

  1. #1
    Silver Member cmputrskillme's Avatar
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    How do I read RAM Sticks????

    Hey Guys,

    Yeah, I can't figure out what the memory stick is unless it's in BOLD BLACK AND WHITE on a sticker Is there some trick or some way for me to know the size of memory sticks when they don't have a sticker? Is there a web page or a book???

    We are getting some donated stuff in, we take the best, donate it back to kids at the local school who don't have a computer to use for homework, etc. We have a hell of a time knowing what's what with some of the memory in them.

    Thanks,
    Sharon

  2. #2
    Near Life Experienced TZ Veteran zipp51's Avatar
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    Download CPUIZ from major geeks or another server and look under the tab "SPD",and there you will see what speed ram you have.
    Last edited by zipp51; November 1st, 2006 at 14:49 PM.
    The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    http://www.computermemoryupgrade.net...re-memory.html

    If you cannot access the computer to check the ram, try the guide above. It gives general outlines for determining the type of ram you have without being able to test it in a machine.

  4. #4
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    I know that I sound like a broken record, but this one program provides a wealth of information about your computer. Belarc Advisor

  5. #5
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    @ efc

    Try WinAudit

  6. #6
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kane View Post
    @ efc

    Try WinAudit
    I did take a look at it. It provides the same type of info as Belarc. The main difference is that Belarc is a stand alone program that does everything within your computer. WinAudit accomplishes the task on a distant server. Call me paranoid, but that always makes me nervous.

  7. #7
    Old and Cranky Super Moderator rik's Avatar
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    Belarc

  8. #8
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    Yeah belarc is good...

    The main difference is that Belarc is a stand alone program that does everything within your computer. WinAudit accomplishes the task on a distant server.
    http://www.pxserver.com/WinAudit.htm

    It is a self-contained single file that needs no installation or configuration. It can be run from a floppy disk or USB stick. Simply download the programme and double click on it.
    whereas Belarc must be installed and then remains on the computer.

    The programme reports on virtually every aspect of computer inventory and configuration. Results are displayed in web-page format, categorised for ease of viewing and text searching. Whether your interest is in software compliance, hardware inventory, technical support, security or just plain curiosity, WinAudit has it all. The programme has advanced features such as service tag detection, hard-drive failure diagnosis, network port to process mapping, network connection speed, system availability statistics as well as Windows® update and firewall settings.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Booger View Post
    http://www.computermemoryupgrade.net...re-memory.html

    If you cannot access the computer to check the ram, try the guide above. It gives general outlines for determining the type of ram you have without being able to test it in a machine.
    From my post:

    Determining your Computer RAM Type

    Currently the cost for adding additional memory is very low. Installation of memory is also fairly simple. It does not require any reconfiguration. The difficult part is determining what type of memory you need.

    Type | Socket | Amount

    More information on memory determination...
    Looking Inside | Check the Manual | Identification

    Type

    *

    FPM – Fast Page - If you have a 486, you probably have FPM
    *

    EDO – Extended Data Out - If you have an early Pentium system, you probably have EDO
    *

    SDRAM - If you have a Pentium or Celeron system purchased in 1999, you probably have SDRAM

    Sockets

    Memory modules plug into a socket on the motherboard. There are three socket types.

    *

    SIMM – 30 pin – 3 inches in length
    *

    SIMM – 72 pin – 4 inches in length
    *

    DIMM – 168 pin – 5 inches in length

    Most older 486 machines will use 30 pin modules. Later model 486 and Pentium machines will probably use 72 pin modules. More recent Pentium machines may have 168 pin.

    Amount

    Memory sizes increase by the power of 2. This results in sizes of 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256 MBs.

    *

    On some older 486 machines, one memory module can be added at a time.
    *

    On most Pentium machines, modules must be added in pairs.
    *

    Each pair must be of the same size.
    *

    SDRAM modules can be added one at a time.

    For example, if you have 8 MBs of memory on a Pentium, you have two 4 MB modules. To increase to 16 MBs, you need to add two more 4 MB modules. To increase to 24 MBs, you need to add two 8 MB modules.

    Looking Inside

    Now that you know the parameters, how do you determine which type you need? Looking inside the computer will not provide all of the information. It will confirm how many modules you currently have. You can also confirm the type and quantity of open sockets. If you only have four sockets and each socket contains a module, you will have to replace some of the existing memory modules.

    Check the Manual

    The other place to find the correct information is your owner’s manual. The manufacturer should have listed the type of memory required. You will need to determine the parity and speed.

    Identification

    Now that you have the necessary information, you find an ad for memory and still you may not be able to determine which modules you need. Why? Because the computer industry thrives on confusion and abbreviations. Here’s how to interpret the coding scheme.

    30 pin modules

    For 30 pin modules you will see something like

    *

    1 x 9-60
    *

    4 x 9-70
    *

    4 x 8-70

    The first number is the size in MB’s. In our example this would be 1MB or 4MB.

    The second number represents parity. The value 9 represents parity and 8 represents non-parity. (Of course that makes a lot of sense!) The 9 or 8 also identifies that it is a 30 pin module.

    The third value represents the speed.

    72 pin modules

    For 72 pin modules you will see something like

    *

    1 x 32-60
    *

    2 x 32-70
    *

    4 x 36-60
    *

    8 x 36-70

    Just like the 30 pin modules, the first value represents the size, EXCEPT it only represents ¼ of the total memory size. Don’t ask why, just accept it. So the value of 4 represents a 16 MB (4 x 4) module. A value of 8 represents a 32 MB (4 x 8) module.

    The second value, again just like the 30 pin, represents parity and the number of pins. 36 is used for parity and 32 for non-parity. You aren’t asking why again, are you?

    The third value represents the speed, the same as the 30 pin.

  10. #10
    Head Honcho Administrator Reverend's Avatar
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    Both of those programs are useful if you have a working PC.

    However, I could be wrong but i think Sharon wants to know how to visually identify an unmarked stick of RAM that is not installed on a PC.

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  11. #11
    Hardware guy Super Moderator FastGame's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reverend View Post
    Both of those programs are useful if you have a working PC.

    However, I could be wrong but i think Sharon wants to know how to visually identify an unmarked stick of RAM that is not installed on a PC.
    Thats how I took it.

    This is what I have http://www.memorytesters.com/

    Or have a working PC for every ram type.

    Or read the code on the chip, decipher it (google, manufacture..??) and add the chips up.

  12. #12
    Silver Member cmputrskillme's Avatar
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    Yep, Rev, thats how I meant it, I needed a way to visually identify RAM sticks when they come in donated computers or simply in bags. So far, the page Boogs steered me to help me make some sense of it. Most of these pc's are not working, which is the problem.

    And hey FastGame, my husband LOVES the memory tester!

    We use Belarc religiously and love it!

    Call me a dreamer, but I wish it wasn't so hard to make things work!

    Thanks guys for the help!

    Sharon

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