With its new Start screen made of live tiles and its bold redesign, Windows 8 will have a challenging time getting consumers to embrace such radical change. But the enterprise will be even worse, according to a new report and webinar from research firm Gartner.

It's not that the new Windows 8 user interface and baked-in touchscreen functionality for tablets is not good and necessary, says Gartner analyst Steve Kleynhans, it's just that enterprises still running Windows XP do not want or need it for the immediate future.

"The issue with most organizations is they are interested in a desktop operating system," says Kleynhans. "They don't want to train users and make radical changes to their environment. Windows 8 is a big step for any user, but it's an even bigger step for a Windows XP user."

In the general Windows cycle, Windows 8 is a victim of the "every second release" syndrome, according to Gartner. Windows 2000, Windows Vista and now Windows 8 have all faced the same conundrum: they are a significant change from the previous version. The code has gone through plumbing changes not just a polish, which affects how drivers are installed and how compatible older applications will be with the new environment. In short, "plumbing" releases are difficult to migrate to, the uptake is slower and they are less successful.

Windows XP and Windows 7 were what Gartner calls "polish" releases, evolutionary not revolutionary. Application and driver compatibility were smoother and ultimately the two OSes were more successful with high adoption rates.

"Because Windows 8 is a 'plumbing' release, it will not see the acceptance of Windows XP or Windows 7," says Kleynhans.