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Thread: Coaxial Cable Networking

  1. #1
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    Coaxial Cable Networking

    Networking your house is a problem. Either you rip up your walls, and run Cat5e unshielded twisted pair cables, or use your existing phone lines, AC power, or add in wireless.
    If you go the Cat5 route, you get fast, 100 megabits per second networking, capable of supporting multiple HDTV or regular video streams, audio, and lots lots more. It's more than fast enough for any home's needs. But if you use AC Power, phone lines or wireless you get much less performance - in most cases not even fast enough to ship a single video stream from point a to point b.

    But there's another networking topology already in most homes - the RG6 or RG59 television coax cable used to send antenna, cable or satellite signals around your home, and to your TVs and settop boxes. It's never been used for networking data, because the cables are dirty, there are attenuation problems, and other issues.

    But back in the early days of Ethernet networking, special high-grade coaxial cables were used in a bus mode. And now, Coaxsys has brought those days back, with its new version of Ethernet over standard TV-grade coaxial cable.

    The devices are fiendishly simply. A four port Pure Speed Network Hub sits where your TV signal enters the house, and then propagates that signal around either a star-based or splitter based coaxial network. Further down the coax cable plant, a Coax to Ethernet converter, called a Pure Speed Network adapter, converts from the 8-wire plug-based Ethernet used by today's networked devices into a signal that can transmit along the coaxial cable.

    The devices operate at the physical layer of the network, which means there's no funky packet distortion going on. And they turn the coaxial cable plant into a standard CDMA Ethernet device, using collision avoidance and detection, and even the same Ethernet frames.

    The system transmits and receives in the available bandwidth between Cable TV channels, and where Satellite TV operates. The company says that it will work simultaneously with TV, Satellite, cable modems and cable phones without interference.

    The company claims speeds of 100 megabits per second - the same as today's fast Ethernet, and with a software upgrade, 1 gigabit per second is possible. The network supports up to eight adapters, although with Ethernet hubs many more than eight devices can communicate over the network.

    Because the network is so fast, it should support many simultaneous video and audio streams. It will quickly connect game consoles, PCs, PVRs and other devices with Ethernet ports together and to the internet. It's pretty much the holy grail of home networking - a fast Ethernet network, using the cheap and ubiquitous TV coax cable - which most cableTV providers are more than happy to run around your house for a nominal charge.

    Of course these are all claims made by Coaxsys. We'll have to see if the products really operate at the speeds promised, without significant delays from interference. They also should be simple to install, but we'll be verifying that claim too when we get our hands on the devices.

    There is one drawback, and that's price. A network starter kit with two adapters and the four-port hub will cost $350 when the devices are released in July. That's considerably more than any wireless solution connecting two rooms together, although you do get a lot more bandwidth. The company expects that price to fall over time, but for now, it's a lot of money to spend, albeit for some pretty sweet bandwidth.

    http://gamers.com/news/1383558

    http://www.coaxsys.com/ - website that this news is about.

    Very interesting concept indeed.. Might save some of you a heap of funds by using your existing coax cable to network your homes and businesses!

  2. #2
    Phoar!! TZ Veteran zErO's Avatar
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    Sounds interesting
    we get cable via satellite were we are, I for one would give it a go though probably not until they sort out any teething problems...nothing worse then a super fast connection that has glitch's.
    would be very interested to see the costs associated with this kind of connection
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  3. #3
    Hardware guy Super Moderator FastGame's Avatar
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    Hmm I must be missing something could've swore they have used coaxial cable for way longer than CAT5....are you guys just talking about Home use ?

    CAT5 cable is way cheaper than Coax cable.

    I've wired many large Commercial & Industrial LAN systems since the 80's using coaxial as main trunk & sub feeders

    what are we talking about

    For Home & small to medium Office use CAT5 is faster, cheaper and easy to work with
    Last edited by FastGame; May 29th, 2003 at 12:52 PM.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    FG we are talking about using existing coaxial cable to run a home network or business network that doesn't have ethernet cable installed.

    It definitely would be better to use the existing cable preinstalled in your home or business than it would be to install new ethernet cables, connectors, and outlets.. not including the time, structural issues...etc...

    I mean I would love to use this in my home as we have coaxial connections in every major room complete with standard outlets..

    Why would I run ethernet when I can use the cable that is already installed? and have access in every room that it is installed.. which in most homes and businesses coax is already present..

    Cat5 is cheaper but it isn't as prevalent as coax in older homes and businesses.


    Lastly:

    The company claims speeds of 100 megabits per second - the same as today's fast Ethernet, and with a software upgrade, 1 gigabit per second is possible. The network supports up to eight adapters, although with Ethernet hubs many more than eight devices can communicate over the network.

    :P

    that says it all.

    The only catch is the 350 dollar equipment purchase.
    Last edited by Big Booger; May 29th, 2003 at 12:57 PM.

  5. #5
    Hardware guy Super Moderator FastGame's Avatar
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Big Booger
    FG we are talking about using existing coaxial cable to run a home network or business network that doesn't have ethernet cable installed.

    <FG>oh now I understand

    It definitely would be better to use the existing cable preinstalled in your home or business than it would be to install new ethernet cables, connectors, and outlets.. not including the time, structural issues...etc...

    <FG>oh and put guys like me out of work..hehe

    I mean I would love to use this in my home as we have coaxial connections in every major room complete with standard outlets..

    <FG>most homes aren't like this but in your case I understand

    Why would I run ethernet when I can use the cable that is already installed? and have access in every room that it is installed.. which in most homes and businesses coax is already present..

    <FG>1. to save on the cost of everything needed to use the coax
    2. you probley already have ethernet run to the rooms needed so why bother ?
    3. if your going to pay someone to hook up this coax LAN then you might as well run ethernet...probley still cheaper ? if your doing it yourself then guess you need to decide whats worth what ?


    Cat5 is cheaper but it isn't as prevalent as coax in older homes and businesses.

    <FG> why don't they just figure a way for us to use our phone jacks ?


    Lastly:

    The company claims speeds of 100 megabits per second - the same as today's fast Ethernet, and with a software upgrade, 1 gigabit per second is possible. The network supports up to eight adapters, although with Ethernet hubs many more than eight devices can communicate over the network.

    :P

    that says it all.

    The only catch is the 350 dollar equipment purchase.

    <FG> oh is that all...hehe, $350 buy's a whole lot of shielded ethernet..prolly could do all your neighbors homes too ?

    BTW I'm not trying to be a smarty...just pointing out that maybe HYPE doesn't always = worth it...but in this case maybe it does ???

    Anyway now I understand so thanks

  6. #6
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    yep,
    But compare 350 to the cost of hiring someone to come in and wire a home..

    By the way how much does it cost to wire a typical 3 bedroom home with Cat5, including the ethernet wall jacks? Professional installation? (no holes in the walls (visible)
    :P

  7. #7
    Hardware guy Super Moderator FastGame's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Big Booger
    yep,
    But compare 350 to the cost of hiring someone to come in and wire a home..

    By the way how much does it cost to wire a typical 3 bedroom home with Cat5, including the ethernet wall jacks? Professional installation? (no holes in the walls (visible)
    :P
    Thats a hard one to answer...depends on the labor market and whether it's Union labor or non Union ???

    If the demand were great enough I'd do a 3 bedroom home in ethernet for $250 and make $1,000 a day easy as pie rather have firewire ? no problem , oh and for another $100 i'll give you a dedicated 20amp,isolated ground, isolated neutral circuit for your computer so it will be hooked the right way

    Of coarse BB you know that if you pay my way to Japan I'll do your's for free

    Hey Lynch...wana start a Company ?
    Last edited by FastGame; May 29th, 2003 at 15:07 PM.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    :d The ticket to Japan from the great lakes area would set me back a pretty penny or yen :P

    Most newer homes come preinstalled with ethernet right? I've heard fiber is even becoming popular in most urban developments..

    I think when I eventually purchase a new home I will have it prewired with the latest cabling technology (most likely fiber optic)..

    Hell I'll even make my own Iloo.

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