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Thread: I got a problem

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    I got a problem

    HI i just purchased a new motherboard and processor, and this is the system i have:

    Abit BH7 Mobo
    Pent 4 2.8 (533) processor
    512 2100 DDR mem
    Creative Geforce 4 ti4400
    3 HDD and a 48x writer
    iam using the onboard sound and networking

    my problem is when i start the hardware monitor supplied with the board in windows i get an error message stating that my VDDQ voltage exceeds limits the monitor shows that the voltage is around 1.18volts but should be higher.

    i did have a 300watt power supply but have upgraded to 400 there was no change.

    i would like to know how i can fix this problem and is causeing damage to anything on my pc??

  2. #2
    Techzonez Governor Super Moderator Conan's Avatar
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    Can you view those same voltages in the BIOS? Those would probably provide more accurate readings. Another thing is does the monitoring software have adjustable alarm levels? You say that the figure should be higher yet the alarm sounds.

  3. #3
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Some info lifted from a tech document. Link at bottom.

    Intel

    850 Chipset Family:
    Intel

    82850/82850E Memory
    Controller Hub (MCH)
    Specification Update
    May 2002
    R
    Notice:
    The Intel

    82850/82850E MCH may contain design defects or errors known as
    errata which may cause the product to deviate from published specifications.


    VDDQ Leakage
    Problem:
    If the 1.5 V supply for the MCH's VDDQ voltage is turned off (set to 0) and the 1.8 V supply for
    the MCH is on (set to 1.8 V), an internal diode within the MCH will be forward biased. This will
    cause leakage into the VDDQ power plane, approximately 1V.
    Implication:
    During normal operations, this diode is not forward biased and has a leakage current of only
    10

    A.
    Workaround:
    Turn off and power on VCC1_8 and VDDQ at the same time. Follow the MCH power sequencing
    requirements documented in the platform design guide.
    Status:
    There are no plans to fix this erratum.


    Link
    Last edited by Reverend; July 20th, 2003 at 22:23 PM.
    Linux Mint Debian Edition

  4. #4
    Techzonez Governor Super Moderator Conan's Avatar
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    The Abit BH7 Mobo is an 845 chipset.

  5. #5
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Sorry, I concentrated on the VDDQ error instead of the chipset. Here is some info on 845 chipset.

    Intel 845 chipset supports 1.5V signaling AGP cards only and the AGP slot on P4B got 1.5V key in it following the AGP specification in order to prevent a 3.3V AGP card from being plugged in. However, it turned out some AGP adapters such as SiS305 based cards, though operate at only 3.3V signaling level, were notched at the 1.5V key on the golden-finger interface. When using these cards, if the Vddq and VCC3.3 signals are shorted on them, will break up the 82845 memory controller hub as the Vddq is raised from 1.5V to 3.3V instead. In other words, the P4B mainboard will be permanently damaged as a result as soon as the system is powered up with such an AGP card. According to AGP specification, AGP4X mode will work at 1.5V signaling level only. If your AGP card has the 1.5V notch as illustrated in the user's manual but it cannot support AGP4X, please check with your card provider or manufacturer whether it can operate at 1.5V signaling level before it's used in combination with P4B.

    and

    6. Q: Does Intel 845 series chipset support 3.3V AGP card?
    A: Intel 845 chipset supports 1.5V signaling AGP cards only and the AGP slot on
    motherboard got 1.5V key in it following the AGP specification in order to prevent a 3.3V
    AGP card from being plugged in. However, it turned out some AGP adapters operate at
    only 3.3V signaling level, were notched at the 1.5V key on the golden-finger interface.
    When using these cards, if the Vddq and VCC3.3 signals are shorted on them, will
    break up the north bridge as the Vddq is raised from 1.5V to 3.3V instead. In other
    words, the motherboard will be permanently damaged as a result as soon as the
    system is powered up with such an AGP card. According to AGP specification, AGP4X
    mode will work at 1.5V signaling level only. If your AGP card has the 1.5V notch as
    illustrated in the user's manual but it cannot support AGP4X, please check with your
    card provider or manufacturer whether it can operate at 1.5V signaling level.
    Linux Mint Debian Edition

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the help i hope with this information i can sort my problem.

  7. #7
    Phoar!! TZ Veteran zErO's Avatar
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    Try another hardware monitor such as Motherboard Monitor 5.3.3.0, which you can get from here http://mbm.livewiredev.com/download.html
    if your worried about it just set all your cmos settings back to default or recheck for a newer bios version of your MB if its available
    personally try what Conan suggested and recheck the voltage in cmos for an acurate reading, as in windows monitors arent always right
    R.I.P
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