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Thread: Multi-OS DVD for Install/Restore

  1. #1
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    Multi-OS DVD for Install/Restore

    DVD Rs are becoming widespread enough, and the blank discs are finally
    getting inexpensive enough ( <$1 each; about the same per-meg cost as
    blank CDRs) that they're worth a serious look as a routine
    backup/restore/toolkit medium. I'm burning my way through my last
    spindle of bulk-purchased blank CDRs, and will most likely make the
    move
    to DVD when it's time to restock.

    But some readers have already made the jump. Frequent contributor
    CptSiskoX, for example, recently tried this all-in-one OS installation
    toolkit:

    Hi Fred, Here's a backup and restore idea for Windows OSes
    that I think you might find interesting. I succeeded in
    copying the whole entire CD-ROMs from:

    Windows 95 OSR2
    Windows NT 4.0 Workstation
    Windows 2000 Server
    Windows ME (Millennium Edition)
    Windows 98 SE
    Windows XP Pro
    Windows for Workgroups 3.11 (16-bit)

    (all of the above have been legally paid for)


    ...all onto a single DVD-R (and one DVD+R also). I also
    included X-Setup Pro ( http://www.x-setup.net ), IE 5.5 SP2
    (for Win95) and IE 6.0 SP1 for all other Windows versions,
    along with DirectX 9.0b (I know it won't work on Win95 or
    WinNT but it will on the rest), and also included WinImage
    self-extract files from http://www.bootdisk.com for MS-DOS
    6.22, Windows 95 OSR2, Windows 98 SE, Windows ME - and a full
    install with the setup files, etc. for DR-DOS 7.03 (newer than
    MS-DOS 6.22, Y2K support, and much more included).

    So, you can make a boot floppy (for the main Win9x and DOS
    OSes) from the DVD from any other machine with a DVD+ or DVD-
    drive in it, you can perform an upgrade install from existing
    previous versions of Windows, you can also make boot floppies
    for Windows NT and Windows 2000 from the WINNT or WINNT32
    command line install programs included with the setup files,
    you can also boot to one of the boot floppy images to install
    from a command prompt (MSCDEX works with DVD drives).

    This should reduce the CD shuffling, keep all the main Windows
    OSes (and DR-DOS) in one easy to access place. The only
    downside is that many machines lack DVD drives, and those that
    do have them often only support the dash or plus format, not
    both. Luckily, mine supports both DVD- and DVD+. I simply put
    a text file in each OS folder containing the product ID key
    for the OS whose folder it resides in. Included on the DVD
    also, are copies of the latest Service Packs for each Windows
    OS, with the exception of XP SP2 (still a beta, that's why).
    I included NT 4.0 SP6a with the post SP6a security rollup
    package. Also, Win2000 SP4, XP SP1, and the unofficial
    Service Pack 1.2 for Windows 98 SE from
    http://exuberant.ms11.net/98sesp.html ).

    I even managed to put OpenOffice 1.1.1 (
    http://www.openoffice.org ) for Windows on the DVD - the whole
    setup and all installation files...

    And I included 7-Zip ( http://www.7-zip.org - free GPL) -
    which supports most major compression and archiving formats
    (ZIP, RAR, CAB, etc) - since most older Windows versions don't
    natively support .ZIP files. [with the exception of WinME,
    WinXP, 2003, and 98 *if* Plus! for 98 is installed with the
    compressed folders feature]. This way, it's supported all
    around. I could have fit more, but I left all the files on
    the entire DVD in an unzipped format, simply kept in different
    folders to distinguish them from one another. I didn't want
    to have to fool around with ZIP files from the DVD itself,
    since I might need to access the setup programs and files from
    DOS or a command prompt only boot (from a floppy or
    whatever). I had about 25 megs left free on the DVD after all
    of the above. Not much space, but if necessary, I could have
    fit some various tools if desired, too.


    From the Langa List

    I've seen these and if you are wanting to limit the CDRs, 1 DVD can take the place of several CDRs.

  2. #2
    Security Intelligence TZ Veteran cash_site's Avatar
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    excellent Idea, i guess the limitation is you actually need to own a dvd burner for a continued backup routine. Do you think we could buy that dvd from the guy??

    --- 0wN3D by 3gG ---

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