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Thread: Join RIAA Boycott

  1. #211
    She who must be obeyed Super Moderator piaqt's Avatar
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    In case anyone had any doubts, what a bunch of bastards.

    Last night, I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he got in my pajamas, I'll never know.
    love, piaqt

  2. #212
    Security Intelligence TZ Veteran cash_site's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by piaqt
    In case anyone had any doubts, what a bunch of bastards.
    I was just thinking that!! What A$$-holes.... i wish you all the luck Pia

    --- 0wN3D by 3gG ---

  3. #213
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    I will continue my past practices of posting motion picture industry items to this thread because they are using the same strategy and often the same tactics as the RIAA.

    From the Korea Times:
    US Film Makers Sue Samsung Over Glitches on DVD Players


    By Kim Tae-gyu
    Staff Reporter

    Samsung Electronics, Asia’s most valuable high-tech company, is scrambling after multiple U.S. movie studios reportedly took the Seoul-based firm to court, alleging glitches in its DVD players.

    Over the weekend, Bloomberg news reported Walt Disney, Time Warner and three other major film makers filed the lawsuit against Samsung in U.S. court.

    They claimed that Samsung’s DVD players allowed consumers to avoid encryption features that prevent unauthorized duplication and demanded a recall of all the problematic products, Bloomberg said.

    The Motion Picture Association of America estimates that the movie industry lost $5.4 billion last year due to piracy.

    In response, Samsung refused to confirm the high-profile suit that involves Paramount Pictures, 20th Century Fox and Universal Studios on top of Disney and Time Warner.

    ``In fact, we do not exactly know the contents of the lawsuit and the intention of the plaintiffs. We have yet to receive the complaint,’’ a Samsung spokesman said.

    He guessed that the film makers take issue with DVD-HD841, which Samsung had sold in the United States between June and October 2004.

    ``If so, I do not know why the movie studios are complaining about the products, of which production was brought to an end more than 15 months ago,’’ the spokesman said.

    ``We stopped manufacturing the model after concerns erupted that its copy-protection features can be circumvented by sophisticated users,’’ he said.

    In this climate, he said Samsung would react to the lawsuit after the outfit recognizes its real intention.

    Samsung Electronics is the flagship affiliate of Samsung Group, the nation’s foremost conglomerate. It is the world’s biggest maker of memory chips and flat-panel displays.
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  4. #214
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    Exclamation Judge Tells RIAA They Don't Get To Randomly Hunt Through Everyone's Computers

    One thing that's become clear in all of the recording industry's lawsuits against file sharers, is they feel they pretty much have free reign in what they should be allowed to do. That's why they originally wanted ISPs to just hand over names without having to file a lawsuit, and why they tend to take a "guilty until proven innocent" point of view. However, it appears some courts are finally pointing out to the RIAA that they don't have the right to do some of these things. The latest example involves one of the lawsuits, where the accused claims she never was involved in file sharing. The RIAA demanded full access to her computer -- which she rightly felt was a violation of her privacy, as there was a lot more on her computer that obviously had nothing to do with the case. A judge has agreed and told the woman she can hire her own forensics expert, and bill the RIAA for any expenses.

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20060320/0216205.shtml

  5. #215
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Hurrah for crap

    DRM is CRAP. Read what ZDNET has to say. LINK
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  6. #216
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    Thumbs up RIAA etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Booger
    One thing that's become clear in all of the recording industry's lawsuits against file sharers, is they feel they pretty much have free reign in what they should be allowed to do. That's why they originally wanted ISPs to just hand over names without having to file a lawsuit, and why they tend to take a "guilty until proven innocent" point of view. However, it appears some courts are finally pointing out to the RIAA that they don't have the right to do some of these things. The latest example involves one of the lawsuits, where the accused claims she never was involved in file sharing. The RIAA demanded full access to her computer -- which she rightly felt was a violation of her privacy, as there was a lot more on her computer that obviously had nothing to do with the case. A judge has agreed and told the woman she can hire her own forensics expert, and bill the RIAA for any expenses.

    http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20060320/0216205.shtml
    As far as the woman goes I'm all for her. That is an invasion of privacy. I hope in the meantime that she changes her hard drive as that's the only way to protect her info. The wipers that some people use don't do a thorough job so the best bet is to replace the hard drive. Friend of mine was warned by Paramount to stop copying their movies or face civil action. He did stop. In this great age of copying can see where the problem lies and that's in the music and motion pic industry,actually it's with the equipment manufacterers so that the units can record. I remember when the VHS tapes had a jamming signal in them to stop pirating. Being into electronics at the time I just bought an anti-jamming circuit and turned down the vertical output which contained the signal. Copyright laws usually apply to music(15 yr. limit),as far as the movie industry goes I'm not sure about the limit there. In my opinion if it's there it should be free and open to copy for personal use. Maybe like other monopolies it's just GREED al over again. Fred

  7. #217
    Bronze Member bionicblond's Avatar
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    add me to the list. I was never a big buyer of cds, casettes etc. I also have issues with paying for radio. I can understand specialized talkshows, but just plain music, no way. Musicians should be able to make money off their tours and so fourth. What happened to the days when cds were given away for free as ways of promotions. I mean they certaintly don't charge radio stations for them.
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  8. #218
    Junior Member
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    Add me to your list. The RIAA's nothing but a money making organization. Most music copyrights run out in 15 years and then the music is supposed to be free.

  9. #219
    Junior Member Senninkai's Avatar
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    Funny i joined boycott-riaa just earlier today
    The unobserved state is a fog of probabilities, a window of and for error. The watcher observes, the fog collapses, an event resolves. A theory becomes a fact... What is the truth? Tell me, if you know. And I will not believe you. Things are never what they seem. Clean gloves hide dirty hands - and mine are dirtier than most... Without truth, there can be no justice. Justice will be done!

  10. #220
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    RIAA now suing XM radio for new service that allows customers to record, retain music downloaded to Inno device. Read more below.

    Satellite radio in recordings row

    The Inno gadget lets listeners save broadcasts

    US satellite radio firm XM is being sued by record labels over a gadget that lets listeners record songs.
    The recording industry said XM's Inno device, which stores music and divides it into tracks, infringes copyright.


    The lawsuit seeks $150,000 (79,537) in damages for every song copied by XM customers to an Inno gadget.


    XM defended itself by saying that music stored on the device cannot be moved elsewhere and only lasts as long as a customer is a subscriber.

    Royalty talks
    The Inno device turns a radio broadcast into a download service that resembles Apple's iTunes, said the Recording Industry Association of America in its lawsuit.


    The RIAA represents record labels such as Vivendi Universal, Sony BMG, Warner and EMI.


    XM said it would defend itself vigorously against the legal action.
    It added that the Inno does not let people download music on demand like iTunes and only lets listeners record radio shows as the law has allowed for "decades". The device went on sale in early May.


    The lawsuit comes after talks between the RIAA and XM on licence agreements for the Inno device broke down.
    The RIAA and XM are currently re-negotiating royalty contracts for radio broadcasts.


    XM's rival Sirius Satellite Radio recently agreed to pay the RIAA licence fees for its S50 recording device.


    Source: BBC News

  11. #221
    Old and Cranky Super Moderator rik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by efc
    RIAA now suing XM radio for new service that allows customers to record, retain music downloaded to Inno device. The recording industry said XM's Inno device, which stores music and divides it into tracks, infringes copyright

    Sorry but that statement is complete and total .

    If that was truly the case then the RIAA will have to sue all the manufacturers of cassette tapes, old blank 8-track tapes, blank cd's and USB memory keys (You know that car radios are out that can play audio files from those).

  12. #222
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Response from XM Radio.

    Statement to XM Subscribers - The XM Nation

    Everything we've done at XM since our first minute on the air is about giving you more choices. We provide more channels and music programming than any other network. We play all the music you want to hear including the artists you want to hear but can't find on traditional FM radio. And we offer the best radios with the features you want for your cars, homes, and all places in between.

    We've developed new radios -- the Inno, Helix and NeXus -- that take innovation to the next level in a totally legal way. Like TiVo, these devices give you the ability to enjoy the sports, talk and music programming whenever you want. And because they are portable, you can enjoy XM wherever you want.

    The music industry wants to stop your ability to choose when and where you can listen. Their lawyers have filed a meritless lawsuit to try and stop you from enjoying these radios.

    They don't get it. These devices are clearly legal. Consumers have enjoyed the right to tape off the air for their personal use for decades, from reel-to-reel and the cassette to the VCR and TiVo.

    Our new radios complement download services, they don't replace them. If you want a copy of a song to transfer to other players or burn onto CDs, we make it easy for you to buy them through XM + Napster.

    Satellite radio subscribers like you are law-abiding music consumers; a portion of your subscriber fee pays royalties directly to artists. Instead of going after pirates who don't pay a cent, the record labels are attacking the radios used for the enjoyment of music by consumers like you. It's misguided and wrong.

    We will vigorously defend these radios in court and before Congress, and we expect to win.

    Thank you for your support.

  13. #223
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    MPAA allegedly hired hacker to steal email addresses and trade secrets from a company it accuses of conducting copyright infringement.


    http://news.zdnet.com/2100-9588_22-6076665.html

  14. #224
    Head Honcho Administrator Reverend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by efc
    MPAA allegedly hired hacker to steal email addresses and trade secrets from a company it accuses of conducting copyright infringement. [/url]
    http://www.techzonez.com/comments.php?shownews=18224

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  15. #225
    Old and Cranky Super Moderator rik's Avatar
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    'A dark moment for our country'

    http://www.p2pnet.net/story/8906

    That's New York lawyer Ray Beckerman's view on a decision by judge Richard Owen where two John Does, one from the Southwest the other from New York, teamed up in Manhattan to fight back against the Big Four Organized Music cartel's RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America).

    Beckerman represented both Does.

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