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Thread: Join RIAA Boycott

  1. #61
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    "ADD ME TO YOUR LIST".


  2. #62
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    DOWN WITH THE RIAA!!! KEEP IT ALIVE.. TO HELL WITH THEM AND THEIR ILK!!!!

  3. #63
    Silver Member joshsiao's Avatar
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    After reading the posts and seeing this:
    At any given point about 20% of the music every recorded is available legally. The rest is locked away by the labels depriving the creators of a potential source of income, the fans of the music they want, while creating a false market for the band "d'jour."
    All I have to say is this. The so-called taxes and won lawsuit money goes to the labels that publish the artists work. The artists themselves get nothing. Secondly, the false market created causes such CDs to be very costly, thus actually making people go to the Internet for cheaper or free music. Thirdly, due to the false market, there is demand created. This also increases the prices and is a big profit for the labels. The artists do not get any advantage from these. (Think in terms of the Oil Market, low supply and high demand causes the oil prices to be high and the labels as the OPAC, having a monopoly over the market) Forthly, the talk about d/l music from the net makes artists not to earn money is complete BS, because the labels themselves earn the money from CD sales and not the artists. Fith, the labels and the RIAA come up with all these brainwashing BS to protect their profits so that people don't see red at the stock markets. (The rest in the stock markets are all economics and gibberish only for economists not us techs). Ok end of rant.
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  4. #64
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    I encourage everyone to buy anything for Christmas except a CD that would put one cent into the RIAA coffers.

    The RIAA insists that theft is the reason that sales are down. I hope that the boycott is also having an impact.
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  5. #65
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    I agree efc,
    I skipped out on purchasing CDs because of the RIAA and their methods. I'd rather support a drug addicts habit than to give the RIAA one red cent.

    I actually was going to get my wife the Norah Jones' CD for Christmas because she likes her music, but I didn't because it is an RIAA held lable that produces her albums.....

    Again, Merry Xmas RIAA, I hope you go broke!

  6. #66
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    It is time to stir the pot again. New suites by the RIAA.

    RIAA embarks on new round of piracy suits
    By John Borland
    CNET News.com
    January 21, 2004, 10:47 AM PT

    The Recording Industry Association of America launched its largest wave of file-swapping lawsuits Wednesday, filing new copyright infringement suits against 532 currently unnamed individuals.

    The suits are the industry group's first since an appeals court in December blocked its original strategy of identifying alleged file swappers before filing lawsuits by sending subpoenas to their Internet service providers. As a result, Wednesday's legal actions target hundreds of unnamed or "John Doe" computer users, whose identities will be added to the suits only after a court process likely to take several weeks.

    "The process by which we identify defendants has changed, but the program has not," RIAA President Cary Sherman said in a press conference to announce the lawsuits. "Our message should be as clear as ever: We can and will continue to bring lawsuits against those who distribute music to millions of strangers."

    The move comes after a month of mixed news for the RIAA, which had a set of legal setbacks--including the appeals court ruling on the subpoena issue--and some indications that the dampening effect of lawsuits on file-swapping may be wearing off.

    A survey the Pew Internet & American Life Project took in December found that just 14 percent of Americans said they had recently downloaded music from a file-swapping network, compared to 29 percent in a similar survey completed in May 2003.

    In contrast, a report released last week by Internet monitoring firm The NPD Group found that music file swapping rose 14 percent between September and November.

    The RIAA declined to comment on the studies, saying different groups used different methodologies and that it is impossible to compare them accurately. Its campaign had been undeniably successful in teaching people about the legal issues surrounding file trading, executives said.

    "What we do know for certain is that awareness has shot through the roof," said Mitch Bainwol, the RIAA's new chief executive officer, citing the results of a study the industry group privately commissioned. "Prior to the launch of these legal actions, 35 percent of the population understood that (trading copyrighted music online) was illegal. Now, that percentage is in the mid-60s."

    As the group is taking a new legal approach, instituted to comply with the December appeals court order, the new lawsuits are being filed in four batches against large numbers of anonymous individuals. Although suits are bundled around ISPs and are being filed in New York and Washington, D.C., the RIAA declined to name which Net service providers are involved.

    Instead of names, the suits contain information on the Internet Protocol addresses of alleged file swappers. An IP address is a technological routing device assigned each Net surfer by their ISPs while online. The RIAA plans to ask judges to open a legal discovery process that will allow it to obtain the subscriber information associated with those IP addresses. The subscribers' names will then be added to the lawsuits.

    The subscribers will be given a chance to settle before their names are officially added to the suits, Sherman said. However, the settlement amounts offered by the RIAA may be higher than in previous rounds, since the new process has raised legal costs, and the earlier suits have made it far less likely that a file trader could plead genuine ignorance of the law around the issue, the group said.

    Wednesday's suits bring the total number of people in the United States sued by the RIAA for file swapping to 914. Sherman said 233 suits have been settled so far; another 100 suits reached settlement agreements, at an average of about $3,000.

    Other music industry groups in Canada and Europe have indicated in recent months that they are likely to follow the RIAA's lead and begin filing suits against people swapping copyrighted music online in their own regions. None of these legal actions have yet occurred.
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  7. #67
    Head Honcho Administrator Reverend's Avatar
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  8. #68
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Yeah, I didn't see your post until after I put this one in. Still - it might start a new round of post on this thread. It has been active.
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  9. #69
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    John Doe.. good luck laying down the name with the IP. If I were an ISP I'd fight this with all the fevor of a starved tiger. The RIAA should back down and disengage. This is not a war.. you are attacking the wrong crowd. Their sales are even up, yet they continue with this..

    They are pissing off customers, potential customers and it is not having a good effect. I wished kids were more active in this and could understand the effects of buying CDs. Kids are powerful and can make a stand by stopping the purchase of CDs. That would be a great message.

  10. #70
    Titanium Member efc's Avatar
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    Time to rev this thread up again. Below article appeared today.

    washingtonpost.com

    Record Industry Sues More Over Downloads

    By TED BRIDIS
    The Associated Press
    Tuesday, February 17, 2004; 2:07 PM

    WASHINGTON - The recording industry sued 531 more computer users Tuesday it said were illegally distributing songs over the Internet in what has become a routine reminder reminder that college students, teenagers and others can face expensive lawsuits for swapping music online.

    The Recording Industry Association of America filed the latest complaints against "John Doe" defendants in lawsuits in Atlanta; Philadelphia; Orlando, Fla.; and Trenton, N.J. It said the defendants were customers of one of five Internet providers based in those cities.

    Philadelphia is the headquarters for Comcast Cable Communications Inc., the nation's largest cable company. Atlanta is headquarters for Earthlink Inc., another of the nation's biggest Internet providers.

    Music industry lawyers identified the defendants only by their numeric Internet protocol addresses and expected to work through the courts to learn their names and where they live.

    The RIAA's president, Cary Sherman, said illegal downloads continue hurting new, legitimate Internet services for selling music. "We are sending a clear message that downloading or 'sharing' music from a peer-to-peer network without authorization is illegal, it can have consequences and it undermines the creative future of music itself," Sherman said in a statement.

    Last month, the recording group filed lawsuits against 532 computers users who were customers of Internet providers based in Washington and New York. The latest actions represent the largest number of complaints filed at one time since the trade group launched its legal campaign last summer to cripple Internet music piracy.

    The recording group has said previously that after its lawyers discover the identity of each defendant, they will contact each person to negotiate a financial settlement before amending the lawsuit to formally name the defendant and, if necessary, transfer the case to the proper courthouse. Settlements in previous cases have averaged $3,000 each.
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  11. #71
    Head Honcho Administrator Reverend's Avatar
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    It also appeared on the TZ front page today http://www.techzonez.com/comments.php?shownews=7372

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  12. #72
    all bets are off... TZ Veteran SupaStar's Avatar
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    That's where I saw it (thanks Rev), and I don't like it one little bit!

  13. #73
    Security Intelligence TZ Veteran cash_site's Avatar
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    What is the implication of the "John Doe" case? how are they going to put IPs to names? Do they have a big list of IPs ie 10,000+ and they are slowly going thru them? like the CHildPorn website sting ??

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  14. #74
    Super Moderator Super Moderator Big Booger's Avatar
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    And what about the ISPs that go defunct in the time it takes this to go to court??

    This is a joke and a lame attempt at the RIAA to get more publicity in hopes that file sharers will be scared off by their silliness.

  15. #75
    Succeded in braking Windo TZ Veteran Dehcbad25's Avatar
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    Now, is this a stupid question?? But anyhow I will ask it, woudln't the RIAA be better if it targets to illigal profiting from pirated music instead that downloaders??
    I don't remember where, but I read that there are a lot of bands joining together against RIAA because file sharing makes them more popular.

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